Social Network Sites: What do you want others to know?

January 30, 2011 at 11:34 am (Communication, Online Communication, Privacy, Social Media, Social Network) (, , , , , , , )

Task:

Based on three of the provided readings on issues relating to online identity, privacy and/or trust think about online identity in relation to both individuals and organisations:

  • What is important in terms of how we present and manage those identities online?
  • What can we share and what should we retain as private to the online world?

Readings:

De Rosa, C., Cantrell, J., Havens, A., Hawk, J., & Jenkins, L. (2007). Section 3: Privacy, Security and Trust. In Sharing privacy and trust in our networked world: A report to the OCLC membership. Dublin, Ohio: OCLC. [ebook] Available http://www.oclc.org/reports/pdfs/sharing_part3.pdf

Mallan, K. & Giardina, N. (2009). Wikidentities: Young people collaborating on virtual identities in social network sites, First Monday, 14 (6), 1 June. Available http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/viewArticle/2445/2213

Rayne-Goldie, K. (2010). Aliases, creeping, and wall cleaning: Understanding privacy in the age of Facebook, First Monday, 15 (1), 4 January. Available http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2775/2432

Response:

What is important in terms of how we present and manage identities online?

Presenting and managing your online identity within social network sites (SNS) comes with the responsibility to understand ‘who can see what, when and how’ from the content connected with your SNS profile. The use of user selected privacy settings towards the distribution of personal details, photos, videos and comments can help in defining and controlling how your information is available to others.  So what is important when choosing your SNS account privacy settings?

  1. Gain an understanding of how the SNS works in distributing the information you – and your online friends – contribute about yourself and your social activities.
  2. Discover who has the ability to ‘see’ the information posted about you – because you might find that it’s not just your ‘friends’.
  3. Find out what your rights are in managing comments or tags associated content posts from yourself and others.

What can we share and what should we retain as private to the online world?

The limits on what we are able to share through SNSs’ are generally confined to text comments, links to other websites, videos, and photographs.  However, some SNS’s – like facebook – also have the ability for other users to ‘like’ and ‘share’ information with their friends by on-posting your content on their walls. So deciding what to share and what to keep private has become mostly a personal decision for each user.  This statement is justified by considering Raynes-Goldie (2010) view regarding the merging of the traditional ‘informational privacy’ and ‘expressive privacy’ into a new online-related form which she has dubbed ‘social privacy’.

When deciding what you want others to have access to online, as yourself questions such as:

  1. What did I join the SNS for – meeting new people, socialising with existing friends or connecting with other professionals?
  2. What do I feel comfortable with people whom I possible do not know seeing about me and my social activities?
  3. What contact information do I want to make available for use?
  4. How do I want to connect with other users – through common interests or just approved friends?

Your answers to these questions will give you a good basis for understanding what you are looking to gain from the SNS. They will also assist in guiding your choices for setting privacy levels that you feel comfortable in maintaining towards the distribution of content linked to your profile.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: